The Cliffs of Moher

The Cliffs of Moher are one of Ireland's top Visitor attractions. The Cliffs are 214m high at the highest point and range for 8 kilometres over the Atlantic Ocean on the western seaboard of County Clare. O'Brien's Tower stands proudly on a headland of the majestic Cliffs. From the Cliffs one can see the Aran Islands, Galway Bay, as well as The Twelve Pins, the Maum Turk Mountains in Connemara and Loop Head to the South.

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Golfing in the Shannon Region

The coastal grandeur and unspoiled greenery of the Shannon Region, easily lends itself to the relaxing game of golf. Here you will find more than 30 quality courses, each one uniquely challenging and with a character that is visually exciting.

Golfers visiting the Shannon Region can test their skills on the windswept dunes of a championship links, challenge the water traps and other hazards of new courses created by some of the world's most famous designers or just play a relaxing eighteen holes on a mature parkland of tree-lined fairways.

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Walking the best way to experience the Shannon Region

Walking is truly the best way to experience the beauty of the Shannon Region. A network of quiet country roads and lanes, forest paths and mountain trails will take you to the heart of the beautiful, rural countryside.

For serious walkers, there are many well organized routes in the loveliest areas, which are clearly signposted at all junctions with standard way-markers. Eleven national, long-distance walking trails traverse the Region's most interesting scenery.

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The Burren

The Burren is the general name given to the fascinating limestone-layered fields of the 500 square kilometre stone-plated crown for North Clare and South Galway. An upside-down world of contradictions where rivers run underground through a honeycomb of caves carved by nature through low-resistance limestone; year-round pasture flourishes at rocky heights; Arctic, Alpine and Mediterranean plants grow side by side as strange flower-bed fellows in secret stone pockets and rocky wrinkles.

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The Aran Islands.

The Aran Islands are richly unique. Landscapes of limestone rock, a stretch of cliffs facing the moods of the Atlantic, large boulders, rock formations, and unusually clean beaches. It is also a place steeped in immense cultural heritage and history. Gaelic language is the first language of its residents. It is considered the foothold of Irish culture. The Islands themselves are an outdoor museum of artifacts of religious and cultural importance. The three Aran Islands, Inis Mór (Big Island), Inis Meáin (Middle island) and Inis Oírr(East island) are situated in a North westerly South easterly direction at the mouth of Galway Bay, Ireland. Ferries depart daily to the Aran Islands from Doolin.

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Visit Cork City

Steeped in history, Cork City is fast gaining a reputation as one of Europe's hippest cities. Exploring Cork is an enjoyable, multi-day pursuit. Ring the Shandon Bells in the 300 year-old tower of St. Anne's Church, and marvel at the French Gothic spires of St. Finbarr's Cathedral.
You will discover unique shopping and dining options, including the English Market, with its stalls selling foods from all over the world, and numerous pedestrian walkways and sidewalks flanked by smart boutiques and major department stores.
At every corner you'll come across another panoramic view, another interesting architectural feature and some of the best art galleries, theatres and museums in Ireland. No visit would be complete without a trip to Blarney Castle, home to the famous Blarney Stone. Tradition says that those who kiss the stone will receive the gift of eloquence.

 

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Golfing in Cork

Cork is a supreme location for the golfing enthusiast. From courses located on the rugged breathtaking peninsula on the southern coast of Ireland, jutting dramatically out into the Atlantic, to secluded courses among luscious green countryside, Cork county is the perfect premise for experienced golfers or those just starting out. Including courses which have hosted Murhpy’s Irish Open, you are sure not to be disappointed! Whether you are staying in the City or County a golf course is within a 20 minute drive from you.

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Explore The Regions

From the lively centre of Cork City, to the sweet tranquillity of Mizen Head, County Cork is a study in contrasts. County Cork is situated in the South West of Ireland, it is the largest of all the Irish counties and in many ways the most varied. Rich farmlands and river valleys contrast with the wild sandstone hills of the west, and above all there is the magnificent coastline scooped and fretted by the Atlantic into great bays and secret coves, strewn with rocky headlands and long soft golden sands. One moment you are in the midst of a world-class shopping expedition, and the next, you are pausing to absorb a spectacular seaside vista. All of which makes County Cork a unique and delightful area to visit. The Rivers Lee and Blackwater, flowing through gently Rolling Meadows to the sea, will serve as your guide as you explore this delightful County.

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Watersports

Situated in the southwest of Ireland, Cork County sits on the Atlantic Ocean, making it the ideal spot for the water sports enthusiast. From discovering the depths of the sea, sailing off into the sunset, or relaxing on the beach, Cork County has a water adventure for people of all ages. From fishing to sailing, from surfing to scuba-diving you will find it in Cork.

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Giants Causeway

For centuries countless visitors have marvelled at the majesty and mystery of the Giants Causeway. At the heart of one of Europe’s most magnificent coastlines its unique rock formations have, for millions of years, stood as a natural rampart against the unbridled ferocity of Atlantic storms. The rugged symmetry of the columns never fails to intrigue and inspire our visitors. To stroll on the Giants Causeway is to voyage back in time.

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Old Bushmills Distillery Co.

The Old Bushmills Distillery is the world’s oldest licensed whiskey distillery having received its licence to distil in 1608. It is devoted to the production of Single Malt Irish Whiskey. The great tradition and craftsmanship first established in 1608 has been handed down over the generations and has been conserved to this very day. As a result there have been very few changes in how Single Malt Irish Whiskey is made today.

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Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge

A short coastal footpath leads to Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge. On the way, there are wonderful vantage points to stop and take in the natural beauty. The geology, flora and fauna have won Carrick-a-Rede recognition as an area of special scientific interest.

Of course, Carrick-a-Rede also boasts an exhilarating rope bridge experience. Traditionally fishermen erected the bridge to Carrick-a-Rede island over a 23m-deep and 20m-wide chasm to check their salmon nets. Today visitors are drawn here simply to take the rope bridge challenge!

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Glens of Antrim

Famed in poetry, song, myth and magic there are nine Glens of Antrim - Glenarm, Glencloy, Glenariff, Glenaan, Glencorp, Glenshesk, Glentaisie, Glenballyeamon, Glendun - each endowed with an evocative name and each weaving its own special magic. Lush, green secret places with the sound of water alternately softly swirling, then falling in dramatic torrents, the nine Glens delight the senses. Entwined with their rich beauties are equally diverse and magical stories, combining the colourful history, myth and the traditions of the communities within the glens.

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Belfast

Whether it’s culture, history and heritage or entertainment, shopping and fun you will find it in Belfast.

Open and compact, with acres of idyllic parkland, Belfast is very accessible and easy to get around and explore on foot. This city encompasses the historic cultural heartland of the Cathedral Quarter, the cosmopolitan charms of the Queen’s Quarter, the cultural diversity of the Gaeltacht Quarter and the waterfront development of the Titanic Quarter, host of the new Titanic visitor Centre, the world’s largest Titanic Visitor Experience, where you will visit the birthplace of the Titanic and experience the story from her birth in Belfast to the fateful maiden voyage and her eventual discovery on the seabed.

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Tory Island

Visit the beautiful and traditional island of Tory, off the coast of Donegal and meet the last remaining King of Ireland - Patsai Dan Rodgers. The island also has its own painting school, founded by Derek Hill where you can see the work of some local artists - including Patsai Dan. This is a day trip not to miss...

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Glenveagh National Park

Glenveagh National Park lies in the heart of the Derryveagh Mountains in the north-west of Co. Donegal. It is a remote and hauntingly beautiful wilderness of rugged mountains and pristine lakes. The Park, over 14,000 acres in extent consists of three areas. The largest of these is the former Glenveagh Estate, including most of the Derryveagh Mountains. To the west are the quartzite hills around Crocknafarragh and to the South, the peat lands of Lough Barra bog, Meenachullion and Crockastoller.

The Park contains the peaks of the two highest mountains in Co. Donegal, Errigal (752m) and Slieve Snaght (683m). The steep sided valley of Glenveagh holds the 5.5km-long Lough Veagh. A fine Victorian castle surrounded by beautiful gardens is picturesquely located on the eastern shore of the lake and provides the focal point for visitors to the Park.

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Dolphin Watching

To get the full benefit of any visit to Donegal Town, a trip on the Donegal Waterbus is a "must". During an 80 minute cruise that explores the history, environment and wildlife of the unique estuary of Donegal Bay, the boats skipper, Billy Bustard, gives a lively commentary on the sights of special interest, freely illustrated with his own humorous asides and anecdotes. If you're lucky, you will spot some dolphins swimming alongside the boat during the cruise.

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Walkling Tour of Derry

Join a scheduled guided walking tour of the historic Derry city walls. Find out about this city, both in the part during troubled times to the present peaceful times. The tour lasts for 1 ½ hours.'

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Activities

Donegal offers you a beautiful environment for all kinds of activities……

Fishing Deep Sea or Fly Fishing, Sightseeing, Dolphin spotting, Golf, Angling, Equestrian, Hiking and biking, Water sports, Scuba diving, Bird watching, Beachcombing, Photography, Art classes, Irish dancing and Poetry reading.

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Visit Trinity College

Trinity College was founded in 1592 by Queen Elizabeth. Among many famous students to attend the college, were playwrights Oliver Goldsmith and Samuel Beckett. Trinity's lawns and cobbled quads provide a pleasant haven in the heart of the city. The major attractions are the Old Library and the Book of Kells, housed in the Old Library.

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Guinness Storehouse

Dublin is known as the heart and soul of Ireland, and Guinness is at the heart of the city itself. So a trip to this vibrant capital is not complete without a visit to the home of Guinness and Ireland’s number one visitor attraction – Guinness Storehouse.

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Kilmainham Jail

Built in 1792, it is Ireland's most famous disused prison. It held throughout the years many famous Nationalists and Republicans in members of the Society of United Irishmen (1798), Young Irelanders (c1840s), Fenians and Land agitators, Parnell, Davitt. The leaders of the 1916 Ester Rising were executed here. The prison was closed in 1924. This building gives a good insight into the history of Irish Republicanism.

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Visit Temple Bar

Temple Bar is Dublin's Cultural Quarter. Located in the heart of Dublin's City Centre, some of Dublin's best night spots, restaurants and unusual shops line these narrow, cobbled streets running between the Bank of Ireland and Christ Church Cathedral.

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Shopping in the Capital

With its bustling city centre and lively suburbs Dublin provides the ideal setting for shopping, offering the visitor a wonderful array of products ranging from the traditional to the contemporary.

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The Aran Islands.

Here, on the very edge of Europe, is an Island rich in the language, culture and heritage of Ireland, unique in its geology and archaeology and in its long tradition of gentle hospitality. Here is a place to sense the spirit of Gaelic Ireland, to touch the past, but with all the comforts and facilities of the present. Aran will take you back to an Ireland of Celts and Early Christians. This is an island of great peace and tranquility, but it is also an island of great fun and activity.

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Connemara

From the rugged Twelve Bens mountain range in the North through lake-rich Roundstone Bog to the golden beaches reaching out into the Atlantic Ocean, you'll know you're in Connemara by the light that constantly changes the mood and tone of the landscape. Connemara has long been regarded as the real emerald of Ireland.

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Kylemore Abbey

Kylemore Abbey, located in the Kylemore Pass in Connemara, Co. Galway, has been home to the Irish Benedictine nuns since 1920. The Benedictine nuns bought the house in 1920, having fled their convent in war-torn Belgium in 1914, where they ran a boarding school for girls for over 300 years. They re-established the school here and it is still very much alive today. Set in the heart of Connemara, Kylemore Abbey shares its woodlands, lakes and rivers with a large variety of birds and animals. A trip to the West of Ireland is not complete without experiencing the beauty and tranquility of Kylemore Abbey and Gardens. Facilities at Kylemore include a visitor centre, an exhibition housed in the main reception rooms of the house and a video which takes the visitor through the history of the house and its occupants. The Visitor Centre and exhibition, Gothic Church and Craft shop are open all year.

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Galway City

Galway has a student population of approx. 25,000 attending the National University of Ireland Galway and the Galway Institute of Technology. This continuous flow of bright, young undergraduates keeps the city colourful and alive during the Autumn, Winter and Spring months.

During the Summer, the visiting population from every corner of the globe adds to the city's mystique and wonder. Summer schools abound for foreign students and the chattering noise of different languages and dialects make this place seem like a microcosm of our world. The natives are friendly and welcoming and the visitor is greeted with a smile, if not a greeting.

Buskers and musicians can be found on most street corners and it is rare to walk through the heart of the city and not hear the notes of a harp, accordion, guitar or fiddle.

The Arts thrive in this bohemian city and music is its lifeblood. Rare is the pub or hostelry which does not have a music session going on and the spontaneity of someone pulling a tin whistle out of a pocket and launching into a tune makes music what it should be, a shared and wonderful experience.

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The Corrib Princess

Enjoy the relaxed atmosphere of a cruise on board the luxurious Corrib Princess. The Corrib Princess sails from Wood Quay in the heart of Galway city, along the famous Steamers Line, which is the lakes traditional trade route.

The journey takes passengers along the majestic River Corrib and onto the lake providing visitors with unsurpassed views of the historic monuments and natural amenities that make this the most spectacular waterway in Ireland. The Corrib Princess takes you past castles and various sites of both historical interest and natural beauty. There is an abundance of wild life and the Corrib has a peace and tranquillity all of its own.

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The Ring of Kerry

For many people around the world, the Ring of Kerry drive encapsulates their image of Ireland. The spectacular scenery, dramatic coastline, colourful towns and villages and ancient archaeological treasures have been featured in postcards, film, poetry and song. Each twist and turn on the road will reveal new sights - windswept cliffs, breathtaking scenery, spectacular lakes, rich flora and fauna, green and yellow chequered hills and unspoilt beaches.

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The Dingle Peninsula

Peace and tranquility are synonymous with the Dingle Peninsula. Life moves at an unhurried pace, but the local people are quick to offer you the opportunity to share their unique culture and heritage.
An Daingean (Dingle), a beautiful and charming fishing port, is the most westerly town in Europe and a most memorable destination. Gaily painted houses and busy streets lead you to the harbour, where you can meet Fungi, a playful bottle-nosed dolphin who cavorts for the enjoyment of everyone.

 

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The Gap of Dunloe

A breathtaking gap between Purple Mountain faces - horizontal plates of sheer rock that tilt down toward green and watery abundance - the Gap of Dunloe is a jewel set within the highest mountain range in Ireland. A river runs through the gap, with grassy banks for sitting, and picturesque bridges to cross. This is a place to walk, fingers intertwined with your lover's hand, or to be wheeled in a carriage drawn by Klidesdale horses.

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Muckross House

Situated in Killarney National Park, Muckross House and Gardens are among the most popular of Irish visitor attractions. Today, many of the rooms in this magnificent mansion have been restored to their original Victorian splendour. Between the months of April and July, Muckross Gardens are spectacularly adorned with the red and pink flowers of mature Rhododendrons. An Arboretum, containing many trees from the Southern Hemisphere, was established here in 1972.

Muckross Traditional Farms are situated adjacent to Muckross House. These working farms recreate and portray the traditional farming methods, and way of life, of a typical local, rural community of the 1930s.

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Golfing in Kerry

With an unspoilt landscape and an ideal climate Kerry boasts some of the best golf courses in the world, from the great 18 hole championship parkland courses such as Killarney and the Ring of Kerry to the internationally renowned links courses such as Ballybunion, Ceann Sibéal (Dingle), Waterville, Tralee and Dooks. There are many other exceptional courses equally worthy of a visit, offering exceptional value to the visitor and some pleasant surprises.

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Horse Racing

Visit The Curragh, home of the Irish Classics, Naas or Punchestown racecourses for a taste of Irish racing at its best. The Irish Derby at the Curragh, the famous Irish National Hunt Festival at Punchestown and excellent facilities Naas Racecourse offer visitors a wonderful choice of racing.

Shopping

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Angling and Walking

A wide choice of rivers and canals, many with towpaths, are definitely worth a visit. There are also 2 long distance way-marked ways, the Barrow way and the Kildare way, and numerous looped walks and trails.

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Heritage and Gardens

If you enjoy seeing other people's beautiful houses and gardens then County Kildare is the place for you. From the grandest Palladian mansions to captivating, exotic gardens, we have a wide selection of wonderful places to delight and surprise you.

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Shopping

A shopper’s paradise, Kildare Village is home to over 60 designer boutiques at up to 60% off RRP every day, all year round. Spend the day browsing the shops and stop to unwind in of the delightful places to eat such as L'Officina, Starbucks and chocolate heaven – Chocolateria.

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Motor Racing

Take a trip to Mondello Park near Naas, Ireland's only international motor racing circuit.
Motor sport enthusiasts can watch some of the most exciting cars manufactured today race on the challenging Mondello circuit.

 

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Heritage

Kilkenny's rich history can be traced through its many historical buildings and sites. These sites include a number of important ecclesiastical sites such as the The Black Abbey, Kells Priory, Jerpoint Abbey and Tullaherin Church and Round Tower. More recent heritage sites include Woodstock gardens and house, Kilkenny Castle and the Lory Meagher Heritage Centre.

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Crafts Trail

Throughout the city and county of Kilkenny, the visitor will find a host of craft and design studios and workshops.

Renowned internationally for the quality of the craft produced in Kilkenny, the Kilkenny Craft Trail is the perfect way to explore the best of Kilkenny craft.

The Trail features 9 retail studios and workshops in Kilkenny, and includes jewellers, potters, leather & wood workers, glass blowing as well as candle makers.

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Parks and Gardens

Throughout the city and county of Kilkenny you will find an array of modern and traditional parks and gardens.

In the city itself, the stunning castle park includes a duck pond and children's playground as well as a formal rose garden and wild flower areas.

Other highlights in the county include the superb Woodstock gardens and the Castlecomer Demesne.

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Shopping

Shopping with Style since the 12th century, Kilkenny has been a thriving cosmopolitan merchant centre. Today, Kilkenny offers a truly original and eclectic shopping experience that retains its sophisticated edge.

As a centre of excellence for traditional and contemporary craft and design, Kilkenny has long been an important destination for those looking for pottery, offers an impressive collection of boutiques, craft shops and gourmet food stores as well as international high street brands.

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Walking Trails

Castlemorris Wood Walk Trail Guide

Two looped walks that start and finish at the Grand Gates which lies West of the villages of Newmarket and Hugginstown and east of the village of Kilmaganny in South Kilkenny.

-Kilmacoliver Walk Trail Guide

This loop starts and finishes at the car park at the Watering Place – wildlife lakes fed by freshwater springs 1km from the village of Tullahought on the Kilkenny/Tipperary border.

-The Islands Walk, Urlingford Trail Guide

A short walk through the hinterland of Urlingford. Park opposite the Library/courthouse on the Dublin side of town.

-Sliabh Greine Loop

Start from the village of Mullinavat on the N9 between Kilkenny and Waterford. Coming from Kilkenny take the second left turn past the church. After 1.5km take the right turn and after 500m follow the left fork in the road. After 1.5m take the right turn at the T junction and park at the trail head.

- Frochans Loop

Start from the village of Mullinavat on the N9 between Kilkenny and Waterford. Coming from Kilkenny take the second left turn past the church. After 1.5m take the right turn and after 500m follow the left fork in the road. After 1.5km take the right turn T junction and park at the trail head.

-Mount Grove Loop

Start from the village of Piltown. Follow the R698 north, when the R698 turns left keep straight for 1.5km and take the right turn following the South Leinster Way sign posts, the trail head is on the left hand side

For more information on walking trails visit Kilkenny Tourism or download a Trail Kilkenny Directory here

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Thomond Park

No trip to Limerick would be complete with a trip to the newly and dramatically renovated Thomond Park in Limerick city. Since the unveiling of the design for the redevelopment of Thomond Park on the 27th May 2006, rugby supporters have eagerly monitored the building progress of the stadium that has changed the skyline in Limerick forever. Now the province has a multi-purpose stadium facility to rival any modern stadia across Europe and one everyone is justifiably proud of. If Rugby is not your thing then take in a concert at this amazing venue.

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Walking in the Shannon Region

Walking is truly the best way to experience the beauty of the Shannon Region. A network of quiet country roads and lanes, forest paths and mountain trails will take you to the heart of the beautiful, rural countryside.

For serious walkers, there are many well-organised routes in the loveliest areas, which are clearly signposted at all junctions with standard way-markers. Eleven national, long-distance walking trails traverse the Region's most interesting scenery.

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Attractions

Co. Limerick has a whole range of visitor attractions that are well worth exploring. Some of these include the Adare Heritage Centre on Adare's pretty main street; the Foynes Flying Boat Museum - once the centre of the aviation world where Irish coffee was invented; Celtic Park and Gardens; Curraghchase Forest Park and Lough Gur, habitat of Neolithic Man and one of Ireland's most important archaeological sites.

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Limerick City - Just Rocking!

Limerick City proudly stands beside any city in Ireland when it comes to live music and the venues to cater for it. At any time, you can find the smallest local act to the biggest international one, stepping on to a Limerick stage. From Thomond Park to the University Concert Hall to intimate Gigs in Dolans Warehouse you will find it in Limerick.

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Adare Village

Adare, probably Ireland’s prettiest village owes its reputation to its setting in the woods among rich quiet farmlands by the River Maigue that runs through Ireland’s Golden Vale. Thatched cottages line broad streets. With the town’s quality restaurants and pubs, its three ruined abbeys, its plentiful fishing areas, its annual festivals, Adare draws overseas and Irish tourists alike.

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Fishing

Fishing in Mayo is a fisherman's paradise, with its empty riverbanks, full rivers and the cleanest air and water in Europe. The waterways are set against a backdrop of natural beauty and offer both to the experienced angler and the enthusiastic beginner some of the best fishing in the world. Visit the famous shores of Loughs Conn & Cullin and fish for wild brown trout with your own boat and Ghillie who can also offer some expert advice!

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Visit Criagh Patrick adn Knock Shrine

Croagh Patrick is situated five miles from the picturesque town of Westport and the mountain's conical shape soars majestically above the surrounding countryside.

Magnificent views of Clew Bay and the surrounding south Mayo countryside are to be had from all stages of the ascent of the mountain. Follow the steps of Patrick and in doing so meet people from far and near.

The Story of Knock began on the 21st August 1879 when Our Lady, St. Joseph and St. John the Evangelist appeared at the south gable of Knock Parish Church. The apparition was witnessed by fifteen people, young and old. From this miraculous occurrence Knock has grown to the status of an internationally recognised Marian Shrine.

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Visit Westport Town

Westport, designated one of Bord Failte's Heritage Towns, is situated in the shadow of Croagh Patrick, overlooking Clew Bay. One of the few planned towns in the Country, Westport was designed in the 18th Century by James Wyatt. It has become one of Ireland's established tourism centres, with many outstanding features, most notably the beautiful tree lined boulevard known as The Mall, running parallel to the Carrowbeg River.

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Achill Island

Achill Island (24 km x 19 km) is the largest island in the Country and is accessible from the mainland by bridge. Its magnificent sandy beaches, sea cliffs and warm hospitality bring visitors back again and again. Visit the beautiful villages of Dooagh and Dooega, the high cliffs at Slievemore and Minaun, the magnificent beaches at Keel and Keem, under the Achill Head. The famous Atlantic Drive takes you on a journey of scenic splendour, a must for all visitors to Achill.

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Walking

Mayo is a lightly populated and largely rural county, lending itself ideally to walking. The scenery is spectacular and the variety of terrain interesting – some areas are level and easy going, ideal for strollers, while the hills, mountains and bogs offer a stiff challenge to the accomplished walker.

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Sporting Activities

There is a range of exciting sporting adventures on your doorstep in Co Meath; from ice hockey to golf to a day out at the races you will find them all here. Choose from Falconry, Fishing, Go Karting, Golfing, ice-skating and ice hockey, Paintball and Shooting and of course both Horse and Dog Racing, you certainly won’t be short of things to do in Co Meath.

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Explore the Past

Visit the Boyne Valley, one of the most culturally and historically rich parts of the country. There are a variety of ancient sites and cultural pleasures, from the breath-taking passage tomb at Newgrange to the thatched 400 year old Man o’ War pub and Restaurant, you can spend endless hours exploring the past.

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Walking

There are some beautiful places to get fresh air and scenery from canal/River Walks to hill and forest Walks. Why not try the Sli Na Slainte Walk which goes from Laytown, through Bettystown to Mornington, a beautiful 5km walk along this coastal stretch of sandy beach.

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Shopping

Alongside the range of individual boutiques and small craft shops synonymous with trendy market towns, you can explore any of the large shopping centres in Meath. If this is not enough you can always take a trip into Dublin to satisfy your shopping craving!

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Meath Crafts

Some of the most famous crafts in the world were created in Co Meath down the years. The traditions that produced treasures such as the Book of Kells and the Tara Brooch lives on with many craft workers. There are several delightful gift shops to the explored in the rural villages throughout the County.

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Birr Castle

Home to the Earls of Rosse since 1620, Birr Castle is the Private Home of Brendan, the 7th Earl and his Family. As such the House itself is not open to the public. The Award winning Gardens and buildings in the grounds of Birr Castle house an array of unique plants, not to mention a detailed insight into the History of the Parsons family. A stay at the County Arms Hotel is not complete without a visit to Birr Castle & Gardens. The Great Telescope, designed by the 3rd Earl or Rosse, was the largest in the World for 70 years and is now fully restored. Ireland's Historic Science Centre offers a fascinating insight into the History of this pioneering Family, with particular emphasis on Astronomy, Photography and Botany. The Gardens at Birr Castle Demesne are home to some 4,000 named trees many of which are unqiue to Ireland, having been carefully preserved and cultivated following trips to China and other exotic regions.

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Macregol's Gospels

The Macregol Gospel Book is a manuscript copy of the Four Gospels written in Birr by Macregol (Bishop of Birr) circa 800 AD. It is unclear how the manuscript came to be in England but towards the end of the tenth century two clerics, Farman and Owun inserted a translation into the Old English of that time. It is therefore a valuable source for the history of the English language. In 2006, Birr Historical Society, courtesy of the Bodleain Library, Oxford and thanks to the generosity of local people and of friends, obtained a facsimile of the Macregol Gospels to be freely on display in Birr Town Library.

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Birr Childrens Playground

Immediately nextdoor to Birr Library, housing the Book of Birr, this playground is newly opened in 2006 and features some of the most modern and safe equipment in Ireland. An ideal way to spend an hour or two for Children aged between 3 and 12 years.

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Birr Theatre and Arts Centre

Birr Theatre and Arts Centre - Offaly's centre for the Arts - offers a wide variety of theatre and artistic events throughout the year. Enjoy an evening of music, drama, dance, opera, classical music, comedy and lots more. See website for current programme of events www.birrtheatre.com

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Lough Boora Parklands

The most inspiring visitor attraction in Ireland's midlands - Lough Boora has it all. One of the most advanced wetland reserves in the Country with over 130 species of birds including Ireland's only remaining Grey Partdridge. Lough Boora is even better known for the Sculpture Park which must be seen to be believed. There's also walking trails, cycle paths, picnic area, a mesolithic site and lots more planned including a major visitor attraction for all the family - Visit www.LoughBooraParklands.com

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Monastic Ruins at Clonmacnoise

Best preserved monastic ruins in Ireland c700A

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Slieve Bloom Mountains

Ideal for those who seek the tranquillity of an unspoilt landscape, the Slieve Bloom Mountains provide the perfect setting for a cycle, drive or walk. For the more adventurous the 66km Slieve Bloom Way passes remarkably deep glens and beautiful waterfalls. A well sign-posted network of minor roads gives access to a whole host of forested & wooded glens. Tours guides, walking maps and walking programme all available on request www.slievebloom.ie

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Heritage and Culture

Visit Waterford City with an historic Viking heart, full of excitement and colour meeting you on just about every street corner. An interesting attraction in Waterford City is the Waterford Treasures Exhibition, a multi-tiered facility that uses displays of artifacts and other media tools to authentically reproduce the history of the region from the beginnings of recorded history during the Viking Era to the present day.

True antiquity of Waterford can also be found on the quay at Waterford City, where the thousand year old Reginald’s Tower stands guard.

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Curraghmore House and Gardens

Situated in Portlaw, the beautiful Curraghmore House has been the home of the Marquis of Waterford and his ancestors since 1170. The House has an exceptional interior and is set in magnificent grounds which incorporate an outstanding Arboretum, a grotto (made entirely of shells) and bridge over the River Clodagh. The Estate is open Monday to Friday (with the exception of Christmas week and Holy Week) and can be viewed by prior appointment. The guided tours are usually conducted personally by Lord Waterford.

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Walking in Waterford

Whether you want to join a group or would rather discover something a bit special on you own, it is all here. Walking at your own pace whether beside the sea, alongside rivers or through forests and mountains you are free to savour the special charms of this splendid corner of Ireland. A craggy coastline and gentle coastal countryside gives way to rolling hills and towering mountains all crisscrossed by 'way marked ways' walking routes which link many towns and villages.

Whichever route you choose, you will get a sense of the splendid isolation on the quite roads, rugged tracks, or a gentle pathway. You will have a chance to encounter the best of the scenery this area has to offer.

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Golfing in Waterford

You are within easy access to the South East’s top courses.
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Heritage

Take a step back in time and visit one of the many ancient and historic fortifications situated in the county. The Scenic Hook Peninsula on the south coast of Wexford offers some of the most stunning scenery in the country, a wild rocky coast in places and stunning golden beaches in others. Hook Lighthouse itself is one of the oldest operational lighthouses in the world. This area is also home to the ruins of two Cistercian Abbeys, Tintern Abbey and Dunbrody Abbey and is steeped in history and heritage.

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Fishing

With such a long coastline sea and shore fishing is widely available as is excellent game angling. Good coarse angling facilities are available.

Choose fly and bait fishing in the Lakes of Loch Mahon or go Salmon and Trout fishing in Oaklands Lake, Newross. Wexford can cater for the most experienced to the beginners.

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Golfing in Wexford

Wexford is a golfer’s paradise with six championship golf courses within twenty minutes drive and its wonderful natural terrain around the coastline provides superb link land. Taste the mixture of salt and sand by playing some of the famous links or enjoy the beauty of the parkland courses.

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Walking and Cycling

Long distance walking is very popular in the region, as are the many cycle routes.

Immerse yourself in the historic past of Wexford Town with a guided walking tour or choose a coastal walk over the 200km Wexford Shore or Wexfords reclaimed slob land. For the cycling enthusiast, head for Mount Leinster and the Blackstairs Mountains.

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Health and Wellness

By recharging your batteries, pampering your body and refreshing your soul, you’ll find the energy to get the most out of your stay in Wexford County. There are several luxury spas totally dedicated to your wellbeing, and looking forward to enveloping you in an aura of serenity as you soak in the tranquility, the treatments and the therapeutic atmosphere. Wexford County is the perfect place to spoil yourself.

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